29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

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29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
This post was updated on .
29-4-71:   Presenter:  Tony Blackburn

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Y2hX5uPWjwYD_iqPXePO5Kv3xyFmsmoS (the 3rd on the list)

(NEW) McGUINNESS FLINT – Malt And Barley Blues
(20) R. DEAN TAYLOR – Indiana Wants Me  (video)
(NEW) THE MIXTURES – Henry Ford
(28) THE JACKSON 5 – Mama’s Pearl  (danced to by Pan’s People)
(ALBUM TRACK) SHIRLEY BASSEY – Breakfast In Bed - not on the show
(ALBUM TRACK) SHIRLEY BASSEY – Excuse Me - not on the show

(7) RINGO STARR – It Don’t Come Easy  (video)
(NEW) LULU – Everybody Clap
(26) SAKKARIN – Sugar Sugar  (crowd dancing)  (and charts)
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FACES – Richmond
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FACES – Bad And Ruin
(1) DAVE & ANSIL COLLINS – Double Barrel
(22) EAST OF EDEN – Jig A Jig  (crowd dancing)  (and credits)

Note this copy seems to be compiled from multiple clips rather than an original Einsfestival copy, unfortunately the picture quality is quite poor, there are also some sound sync issues and jumps between the links. If anyone knows of a better copy please let me know.

Tony opens the show by announcing some of the audience members this week are from the glamorous sounding 'Slough Technical Training College' where he recently visited to judge a beauty contest, tough job is it Tony?.



First on its McGuinness Flint sadly not with their most famous hit 'When I'm Dead and Gone' but instead the follow up 'Malt and Barley Blues' which I've never heard before, well it isn't too bad but a bit too much like hillbilly music for me, I was never into country music or any of its offshoots, so clearly not the target audience. Nice touch with the blue lighting though. Well why not follow up on one country style record with another? but one a bit more commercial, R. Dean Taylor ‎with 'Indiana Wants Me'. These homemade videos were more of a staple of the show than I first realised, in this one we see a man on the run from the law (presumably the FBI) following a crime committed in Indiana. Despite the sad tone of the song, this is still a really good tale of a man on the run whose luck eventually runs out. The song will eventually reach no 2.

The Mixtures are back already following up 'The Pushbike Song' with this effort 'Henry Ford' a song about erm Henry Ford of olden days cars, although sounding a bit too much like 'Yellow Submarine' to me. Yellow Submarine was sung by Ringo Starr of course and more of him shortly. Back to The Mixtures, this seems like a classic case of the similar-but-not-as-good follow up and despite the producers best efforts to jazz up the performance seating them in a car and showing a montage of olden days car and plane crashes (yes, really!) this one is going nowhere fast.



We are in the midst of a section of links where Tony does a voice over only, possibly to speed up proceedings I'm not sure, but I've heard Tony do that mock northern accented 'right now here's a touch of glamour' so many times I've probably developed a Pavlovian response to perk right up (although no salivating hopefully) since I know what's coming. The Jacksons bubbly record 'Mamas Pearl' of course featuring our very own Hot Pants People and don't they just look great. Hot pants obviously the in thing for girls fashion at the time, and interestingly Pans also had this look when dancing to another Jacksons record 'The Love You Save' back in August 1970, a short clip of which is here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtvZGfyEzIQ

A classic early routine no doubt, the intro where Andrea shows off that butterfly adornment and the girls stride off with such confidence is just great. Then there is the hopping down the line bits, and all look they they are really enjoying this one. At the end we find out they borrowed the hot pants from Tony himself, you wish Tony!.



Next according to Popscene should be 2 'Album Track' performances from Shirley Bassey but neither are in this copy and in fact Tonys link goes straight to the next record. The genome also list the show as 35 minutes (the running time of the clip), so perhaps these were pre-records that were not used. The actual next record is 'It Don't Come Easy' by Ringo Starr and is another video although featuring Ringo himself and made (according to the credits) by a certain Michael Hurrl. Obviously the Beatles wasted no time in establishing solo careers, often with other Beatles in the background and this one is actually really catchy. Ringo is seen mucking about in the snow including a motorised ski sled, nice one Ringo living the dream, hope you didn't blow the budget. You have to feel sorry for whoever had to cart that Piano around though.

Still no sign of Tony as we again go straight into the next performance, someone clearly no stranger to TV pop shows Lulu. This time Lulu has brought all her mates and 'hubby' on stage for the performance of 'Everybody Clap' as if trying to organise a mini folk festival behind her. Normally Pan's People should be in the dressing room by now, but no they have also been roped into this little Lulu party although shoved off camera to the other end of the stage so as not to 'out glamour' the wee lassie no doubt. Still although I think this is a waste of the girls time, we do at least get a scrolling close up of them buts its all too brief. Back to Lulu she 'shouts' her way though the performance which is vaguely rousing I guess but not really for me, my clap-o-meter must be busted and i'm not joining in!

We now see why professional dancers are used on the show, yes its time for the audience to 'throw some shapes' and we also do the chart rundown on that massive screen they seemed to like this way of doing it in 1971, but it does seem to go on for a long while. The track playing is 'Sugar Sugar' by Sakkarin (ho ho, I see what you did there) an odd record indeed and an alias of a certain Jonathan King, never one to take pop seriously. Its been barely 18 months since the original was a big hit, but this is more instrumental with bit of the original vocal added in. Its ok i suppose and I always enjoy watching those early 70s audiences, it may be just me but they don't seem quite as confident as those of the previous year with the cage etc but at least they are still an integral part of the show, something in later years their input seemed to diminsh somewhat.



Tony then has in depth conversation with a girl about the new number one -

Tony - Do you like the new number one?
Girl - Yes

Wow!, that was enlightening Tony, thanks. The Faces are this weeks actual album spot featuring 'Richmond' and 'Bad And Ruin' two contrasting tracks. I'm still not convinced on this album feature though and this is indeed self indulgent for the band, not that its bad, I will always appreciate mucal talent but I still think it slows down the show. The Rod fronted 'Bad and Ruin' would probably be my pick of the two and thats the one gets the audience going too, dancing I mean, not leaving the studio in disgust. After that Tony gets tongue tied and tells us that 'Hot Rex' has been at number one for 6 weeks , before introducing the number one Dave & Ansil Collins with 'Double Barrel', an unlikely number one I guess being straight up raw reggae and not one with a particular socio-political message, no just a catchy (and funky) piano led rhythm with a fair amount of 'I am the magnificent' type boasting from the MC/singer. I like it a lot and its certainly different so thumbs up UK record buyers of 1971 for supporting this one.



But we're not done yet, oh no, the last record gives the audience a chance to go 'a bit mental' its 'Jig A Jig' by East Of Eden. Not only is there a crazy psychedelic jam to start off but suddenly half way through it switches to a sort of Irish Jig (hence the name) which seems to please the crowd, and get them clapping along (see Lulu that's how you do it) but there's a trick, this one is getting faster, and faster....and faster, until eventually the clip can take no more and gives up. Quite silly indeed but probably a lot of fun at a gig after a few pints, good stuff to end on. The band will perform this in the studio on the 20th May when it was at number 7, that must have been quite a performance. And so ends another show.

By the way can anyone identify the instrumental music playing at 21.20 during Tonys link, its driving me crazy trying to remember it.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

VintageVideos
This post was updated on .
Mikey wrote
Note this copy seems to be compiled from multiple clips rather than an original Einsfestival copy, unfortunately the picture quality is quite poor, there are also some sound sync issues and jumps between the links. If anyone knows of a better copy please let me know.
It may seem as compiled from clips but this is an original copy. It was quite common on TOTP at that time that the DJs were not always shown when they made their links between performances. And some of the links were rather short!

Here is a better copy (gone in a week, mind!):

https://we.tl/t-rgruWxJhkB

By the way it seems that the Shirley Bassey tracks mentioned in your intro were never actually part of the finished show.
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
Thanks Vin, a better copy would be great.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

The Rubberband Man
In reply to this post by Mikey
Mikey wrote
By the way can anyone identify the instrumental music playing at 21.20 during Tonys link, its driving me crazy trying to remember it.
It's Roy Budd "Get Carter - Main Theme"
Climate Crisis: This planet's getting hotter than Lulu
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
In reply to this post by VintageVideos
Great stuff, thanks! i've added your link to the opening post, will do some better screenshots soon. Yes it is a bit odd the Shirley Bassey tracks are even there, but here is one of them anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZT6n3AkyxI
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
In reply to this post by The Rubberband Man
The Rubberband Man wrote
Mikey wrote
By the way can anyone identify the instrumental music playing at 21.20 during Tonys link, its driving me crazy trying to remember it.
It's Roy Budd "Get Carter - Main Theme"
Nice one RBM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YO0dHPhDuLs

Good film too.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

RYAN
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mikey
Thanks once again for bringing another show to us Mikey. I have to be honest and confess this one didn't do a lot for me. Im not a big fan of this post-60's pre-glam period. For me the Pans dance was certainly the highlight. I also like the number 1 (digging that Ska sound) and bizarrely i quite like the Jonathan King record. The rest merely plodded along. If i was to award a score for this show it would be about 3 out of 10.
RYAN
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Everything'sRosie
I shall present my findings on this show tomorrow. I've just skimmed through it, and was struck at how poor a presenter Tony Blackburn was (Hot Rex, indeed) he seemed nervous and unsure of himself. We might take the proverbial out of Tidybeard, but he was a slick professional compared to Blackburn.
Queens of My Soul
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Everything'sRosie
McGuiness Flint - Malt & Barley Blues    Love this record, not quite as well known as their other biggie, but a wonderful fusing of banjo and accordion. Good time music.

R. Dean Taylor - Indiana Wants Me Another of those BBC films to visualise the song. Kudos to our escapee as he seems to have fled the States and made it all the way to autumnal England. But, alas, there's no hiding place.

The Mixtures - Henry Ford  Roadrunner! Roadrunner!

Jackson 5 - Mother's Pearl   The record is well known to us folk here because of the Pan's dance. Not the best record imo, but the girls look great in their hotpants, and it's always nice to see Flick.

Ringo Starr - It Don't Come Easy    Ringo still can't ski, but he can play piano in bulky gloves. Belter of a record from Mr Starkey. Tony thinks it should be No.1, so do I.

Lulu - Everybody Clap   More Pan's and a Bee Gee husband. Never really been a fan of these "come and join in" type records. Tedious in the extreme.

Sakkarin - Sugar Sugar   An uncomfortable-looking studio audience are encouraged to do their stuff to this jazzed-up (and pointless) cover of The Archies' classic. Terrible.

While TB introduces The Faces we get a snippet of some film music which I can't quite put my finger on, and for some reason I get a strange compulsion to chuck Alf Roberts off a multi-storey car park.

Ronnie Lane & Rod Stewart incongruously sing a couple of album tracks. More for an Old Grey Whistle Test audience than the pop-loving kids of TOTPs, I'd have thought.

Dave & Ansil Collins - Double Barrel   The brothers are joined on stage by what looks like some Maasai tribesmen. Not really my cup of tea, tbh. One of those numero unos where the song title doesn't appear in the lyrics.

East Of Eden - Jig a Jig    A lively play-out track to finish with. The largely miserable audience shows some life, especially the Slough girls.

Thanks to Mikey and Vin for the uploads. An eclectic mix of songs. The good, the bad...and the indifferent.

Queens of My Soul
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

VintageVideos
Everything'sRosie wrote
Dave & Ansil Collins - Double Barrel   The brothers
A common misconception. Dave was actually David John Crooks who took the alias 'Dave Barker' for his earlier records. After 'Double Barrel' had become a hit, most people thought he was 'Dave Collins' so he made good use of that name for subsequent recordings as a solo artist. The closest he ever came to a hit on his own was with 'Shackatac' in 1972, reaching No. 2 in the 'Breakers' (Bubbling Under) charts:

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
In reply to this post by Everything'sRosie
Everything'sRosie wrote
While TB introduces The Faces we get a snippet of some film music which I can't quite put my finger on, and for some reason I get a strange compulsion to chuck Alf Roberts off a multi-storey car park.
Rubberbandman already ID'd this as Roy Budd "Get Carter - Main Theme"
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Everything'sRosie
Mikey wrote
Everything'sRosie wrote
While TB introduces The Faces we get a snippet of some film music which I can't quite put my finger on, and for some reason I get a strange compulsion to chuck Alf Roberts off a multi-storey car park.
Rubberbandman already ID'd this as Roy Budd "Get Carter - Main Theme"
Yes, I knew. I was just having a bit of a laugh. For those who've never seen it, the unbelievably vicious Jack Carter (Michael Caine) throws Alf Roberts actor Brian Mosely off a multi-storey car park.
Queens of My Soul
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
Ah ok, i did wonder about that. I'll have to watch it again tomorrow as its been a few years since i last watched it.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
Thought i'd better give this a bump as its been up a week and Vins link is about to expire. Would anyone else like to comment on this show?
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Hanway2
  I will be writing up my comments as soon as I have some spare time to do so.
  But you have provided a very big distraction this weekend, so TOTPs and my Pan's reviews have been pushed to one side these last two days.
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
Thanks Hanway, you're one of my best customers, i will have to stamp your loyalty card. How about a motivational picture.

My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Hanway2
Mikey wrote
Thanks Hanway, you're one of my best customers, i will have to stamp your loyalty card. How about a motivational picture.


   THAT IS ALL THE PERSUADING I NEED!!!!!
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Hanway2
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       April 1971, I can remember it like yesterday- almost! As a 10 year old, getting ready to leave Primary School, and move on to my Secondary, I would have been taking more notice of the world around me, and in general, at this point. And I would have been watching Top Of The Pops very regularly by then. Which is not to say I can remember seeing this edition, but it would be likely. Sadly, I cannot remember, but there is one item that stirs the memory- of which anon. The stimulating theme music of ‘Whole Lotta Love’ sets me up very properly to watch, as we see short clips of what would be happening that week. Plus the quick countdown to number 1- and Top Of The Pops. And Tony Blackburn is the host this week. He can be a good host, but sometimes seems over nervous, and repetitive. As the number of times he says ‘lovely’ in the introductory piece. The audience played a big part in the show at this stage, including those that week from the ‘Slough Technical Training College’, with their ‘Scrag ‘71‘ T-shirts. Slough College Rag Week, apparently, I think. But, leave the girls alone, Tony. You may get a bad reputation!
   A great rollicking song from a great rollicking band, ‘Malt and Barley Blues’ by McGuinness Flint kicks off the show. Sung here by co-writer Graham Lyle, also playing banjo, he and friend Benny Gallagher would soon leave the band, and after passing through Ronnie Lane’s Slim Chance, would end up with great success as a duo. McGuinness Flint, a band like a number of other bands seemingly influenced by The Band of Big Pink fame, played a brand of deliberately carefree, uncomplicated music on any number of instruments, and were always a good listen. Here they breeze their way through the song with an ease and a simple style. One I like very much. Even if Graham seems a reluctant frontman on this occasion. Music to get the malt and barley cravings to, if I am not very much mistaken.
   Are we in Indiana? R. Dean Taylor may not be able to go back there, but there is no reason why we can’t. Does this resemble anywhere in Indiana? Maybe yes, maybe no. But this is a film commissioned by TOTPs to cover a hit for an artist that will not be present in the show. As Pan’s People are rather busy this week, as we shall see, a film has been ordered. A great song by an often overlooked artist, from the Motown stable, with powerful vocals and a driving instrumental rhythm to the track. I can remember hearing this song on the radio very often 40 years ago, I wonder if it still is? The film itself is little more than a chase round a quarry, but effective for all that. And as the darkness falls, and law enforcement are on his tail, we know there is no escape. Are those police cars like the police cars in Indiana? Since they have British Licence plate numbers- tumbled again BBC- we suspect not. And I cannot count on the Police uniforms either. But an interesting video for a the song, which deserves to be better remembered, than I feel it is now. And I do feel that I remember this film from then, but it is in a vague and distant haze of darkness.
   The Mixtures, soon after their hit with ‘The Pushbike Song’ with a forgettable follow up, ‘Henry Ford’, which did not find much appeal from the buying public. The film is diverting enough, with the band crammed into a yellow Ford car, against a background of the streets of London, and old footage of cars crashes as an extra, with old aviation craft, for a Wright Brothers verse. A history lesson on cars and car manufacture, just what the charts did not need. Said British music fans. And that was that for The Mixtures, Chugalooing off into history. Time to move on to the next act, and ‘a touch of glamour’!
   Oh Pan’s People! Is it possible to be in love with six women at the same time? Yes, it is, and I am the proof. I am now besotted by all six of them. Watching these routines multiple times has had that side effect- familiarity in no way breeding contempt. And this number to ‘Mama’s Pearl’ by The Jackson 5 is indeed a great joy to watch. I have rated the dance more full in the Pan’s People review section, so will not go into much detail here. Only to repeat that it was given a 10 out of 10 mark, and Louise was my choice for top dancer. So it can be seen how much I enjoy this performance. The girls all look stunningly desirable, the moves they make in the piece are all expertly delivered in unison, and they look to be happy and having a good time. What more could you want? The girl gang of all girl gangs. And I would much rather see them in Tony’s hot pants than Tony himself. Pan’s People- my love for you grows more abundant each day, like a field of wheat in the warm summer sunshine.
   Ringo Starr. Forever known as the untalented Beatle. He should worry, having had considerable success solo, even though thought to not be able to sing or song write to any proficiency. So the story goes. That may be rather harsh on the ever amiable Mr. Starkey, but compared to the other Fab Three, he has been regarded so. But he can sing and write better than his reputation supposes, and he does so here. An oddity of a film to accompany his song ‘It Don’t Come Easy’. On top of a mountain or some snowbound waste, with many snowy scenes of skis and Ringo tearing round in a snowmobile. And it certainly don’t come easy to play a piano in the snow wearing heavy gloves. Our heavily bearded Ringo looks mighty cold, I hope some brought the soup. It makes me feel cold just watching. Time now to thaw out, with a second helping of Pan’s. Great Joy!
   This time supporting Lulu and a whole legion of friends, including hubby Maurice Gibb who certainly looks like the happiest man in the world at that moment. Unfortunately, the song ‘Everybody Clap’ was not chart bound, sorry Tony. Led off to a greatly impressive wail by Lulu, it could have been, perhaps should have been. The fickleness of the public, or was Lulu seen as a light of other days at the time, it being some years since she had enjoyed a run of chart success, despite her exposure on Television. She gives a fine, spirited performance this time, and everybody does seem to have fun in her group, and in the audience. Why her friends are there, who knows? Perhaps Lulu invited them along and the TOTPs production team had no objection. For Pan’s, from the brief glimpses we have of them, they still shine in their Mama’s Pearl costumes. None more so than Louise again for me, who I chose as my ‘Top Mover’ for this too. I don’t suppose we will know when it was decided to include the troupe as a support to Lulu, but it is good that the decision was taken. Any sighting of the girls from this period is most welcome, so little of them remaining. Fun had by all it seemed that day in the studio with Lulu. And the great British record buying public shrugged their shoulders and looked away.
   Jonathan King has been in and out of favour so many times I am not sure where he is right now. The reasons for this are well known, and need not be repeated here. But his release of the song ‘Sugar, Sugar’ under the name Sakkarin is, for me, one of the best things he ever did. Containing some top notch guitar work, by whom I do not know. Clearly a cover of The Archies song, but missing words out and with a more instrumental feel, featuring the noted guitar work which gives it a real punch. More Wah Wah please! Here used as background to the charts and for the dancing audience, which is always good to see. Many of the students from Slough are seen, plus the others there that day. As has been seen from another show from 1971, hot pants were very much in fashion that year, with many examples noted. Some dance more enthusiastically than most and each to their own style which is a good thing, I say. A shy looking girl in a short circular-patterned dress stands out well. But none seem as pleased to be there as the man in the open shirt with rolling arm and high knee movements, taking up a lot of screen space. From the charts, does anyone remember Gerry Monroe, in at 25? Or The Fantastics residing at 16? An early sighting of Sweet at 14 that week, and Waldo de los Rios had come a long way to get into the top 10- all the way from Argentina. ‘Felicidades Waldo’!
   There is certainly a belief I have that the music from the period, roughly of 1967 to 1972, was the best time for popular music in form and creativity. But much of it was away from the charts, by artists who did not consider that a hit single was the be-all and end-all to a music career. And I think the introduction of the album spot on TOTPs was a recognition of that fact. That not all great music was chart based and single released. There was more, and to capture it there was a need to promote a slot on the show away from the charts. But who decided what to play? Once an artist was invited who made that decision? Unlike a single hit, where it would be obvious what had to be played. The album spot was different. Presumably the artists came up with the numbers, informing the production team in advance. And it might be seen as an indulgence by the artist if the number presented was not of great enough quality to be seen on National Television. Fine in concert, no doubt, but not for TOTPs. And an indulgence is what I feel about ‘Richmond’ by this weeks guests The Faces. Sung feelingly by Ronnie Lane, and a precursor to his own work with Slim Chance, it is not bad in itself, and I like to see the variety of National and slide guitars, but it does slow the show down a little too much. It can be seen that the crowd will try to dance at anything. Why not, you might never get the chance to part of the crowd again. Things liven up greatly once Rod Stewart comes to the microphone, which he handles in his own inimitable way. And Ron Wood starts playing his ‘toilet-seat’ guitar. Is this a live vocal to a pre-recorded track? Most likely, as that guitar never worked, according to Ron, and is probably here just for show. Showing how the album spot could lift the programme, ‘Bad n’ Ruin’ is a whole and fine rocking performance from the Faces. A great band for the short period at the top, until circumstances changed and Ronnie Lane and Ron Wood flew away in different directions and Rod Stewart embarked more purposefully on his solo career.
    Now onto the number 1. A new number 1 after T. Rex and ‘Hot Love’. Or ‘Hot Rex’ as our host conflates the name. And confusing the poor girl next to him, it is ‘Double Barrel’ by Dave and Ansil Collins. An unusual number 1 perhaps, though Desmond Dekker and ‘The Israelites’ had preceded it two years earlier. And the members of the group on screen give a good showing, including the bass and drums dressed as tribesmen. A smooth reggae sound provided by the team, led by the ‘Magnificent W-O-O-O-O’. Which gave the audience ample opportunity to move themselves as they will. A number which I had not heard for many a long year, and it was good to reacquaint myself with it. There is not much more I can think to add to this, as we come now to the final part.
    The music loosely termed as folk-rock made very little impact on the charts over the years, although Thin Lizzy and ‘Whisky In The Jar’ turned up in another TOTPs for review earlier. And ‘Jig-a-Jig’ by East Of Eden is another clear example, and that was untypical of the main part of their work. A few Irish reels, not jigs, put together, augmented with rock backing and enhanced by the wizard fiddle playing of Dave Arbus, the playing speeded up towards the end in the style typical of many traditional and revivalist renditions. It is the last part of the track that is played behind the credits, and which the audience seem to enjoy immensely. Several of them noticed earlier are very evident in this play out, including the lovely ‘Scrag Queen’, who had been seen at the very beginning on the right from our point of view. As the playback hits the final reel, a broad smile comes across the face of a girl in a purple dress, as though someone had pinched her- in a good way. The last denouement sees the programme intercutting between several of the very loveliest- I think I have caught this disease from Tony- girls in that day’s audience, I am sure the editors had a wide range to choose from. We must not forget Mr. ‘Open Shirt’ who is somewhere in there too, either, taking up space again. All dancing merrily away as was the custom of the time. Were they encouraged, persuaded or have just come to have a great time? It matters not now, it is a pleasure to see from this far remove.
    1971, a very special and interesting time. What other time would the Top Of The Pops audience be dancing out the end of the programme to the reel ‘Jenny’s Chickens’? A very good edition of Top Of The Pops, but not a great one. Taking Pan’s People out of the equation, it is hard to say which I like best. McGuinness Flint, The Faces second song, the chart rundown and play out with audience participation. I even like Lulu’s performance. All good enjoyable stuff, and hard to pick out any of those above anything else. So, this time I won’t, but I did enjoy watching this show, repeatedly for my review purposes. What more needs to be added? 1971, still a very special time, in music and life in general. Oh to be aged 10/11 again. You know I could witter away about that until 2071.


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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

VintageVideos
In reply to this post by Mikey
This is an edition that I absolutely love - but see for yourself:



Yes with the exception of the two Shirley Bassey tracks that probably didn't belong to the broadcast show anyway and the two Faces tracks, I have every other featured song in my CD collection. Why? Because 1971 was such a great year for music. This excellent show from 1971 with its weird mixture of folk, soul, pop, psychedelia, rock, reggae and prog rock just proves my point.

(NEW) McGUINNESS FLINT – Malt And Barley Blues
Not quite as popular as their previous hit, this is almost as good and of course another Gallagher & Lyle composition. G&L went solo soon afterwards and their first four albums (before their commercial breakthrough in 1976) are all gems of folk-rock music. Of course Graham Lyle is also well-known for his work with Tina Turner (e.g. What's Love Got To Do With It) but I like him best during the early 70s.

(20) R. DEAN TAYLOR – Indiana Wants Me  (video)
A great melodramatic song from the Motown guy who was mainly writing for other artists. This track about defending the lady's honour was his biggest and best solo single. The use of the police car siren predates Block Buster for more than two years. Maybe a bit overdone near the end with all the shooting.

(NEW) THE MIXTURES – Henry Ford
The ozzies were a one hit wonder in the UK, even though this song was in a similar goodtime style. A bit lame maybe but I like it anyway. The crashing planes were a bit irritating.

(28) THE JACKSON 5 – Mama’s Pearl  (danced to by Pan’s People)
How can you not like this PP routine. Mama's Pearl is definitely not one of the J5's strongest recordings but the sight of these beautiful ladies is a more than adequate compensation. The single mix has a different vocal track than the album version btw.

(7) RINGO STARR – It Don’t Come Easy  (video)
For me this is possibly Ringo's best solo single and a nice video as well.

(NEW) LULU – Everybody Clap
Tony is all excited about Lulu's new single but actually this track is just so-so. Fortunately Pan's People come to the rescue again.

(26) SAKKARIN – Sugar Sugar  (crowd dancing)  (and charts)
Ok it's the unloved Jonathan King but apart from that, this instrumental version is quite inventive. Nice alias as well.

(ALBUM TRACK) THE FACES – Richmond
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FACES – Bad And Ruin
Never been a fan of the 'album spot'. Both songs seem out of place on the show. And I don't really like them either.

(1) DAVE & ANSIL COLLINS – Double Barrel
Love this song. I still remember the first time I heard the intro and thought, what the heck is this? This may be the most improbable No. 1 single of the 70s yet Dave & Ansil even managed a Top 10 follow-up with Monkey Spanner. Double Barrel was originally released in August 1970 and took about nine months until it reached the top. The record even went to No. 22 in the US. A great piece of Jamaican music.

(22) EAST OF EDEN – Jig A Jig  (crowd dancing)  (and credits)
Prog rockers East of Eden only had this one hit which sounded unlike anything else they ever recorded. Back in 1971 I bought the single as a 10 year old, only to discover that I liked the jazzrock number Marcus Junior on the flipside even better. Originally released in May 1970 this was another single that took a long time to become a hit.
Watching the audience girls at the end of the show, you can see the smiles on their faces as the rock part in the middle of the song ends and the reel returns. The girls of the early 70s were just a great bunch - they could even dance to prog rock records like this!

This show gets 9.5 / 10 from me as it was almost perfect (except for the album spot)!
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Re: 29-4-71 With Tony Blackburn

Mikey
I bet you havent got this one Vin, its almost like the makers watched the show and said we'll stick those on. Joy to the World is a strange addition as that did'nt appear for another month or so.

My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

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