6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
17 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
6-6-68:   Presenters:  Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1oqO7y0rlYqzn9Xsz8dPzQi6TycAoiJJ4

(1) THE UNION GAP feat. GARY PUCKETT – Young Girl  (and charts)
(19) THE EQUALS – Baby Come Back
(9) DIONNE WARWICK – Do You Know The Way To San Jose?  (video)
(15) DON PARTRIDGE – Blue Eyes
(8) JULIE DRISCOLL, BRIAN AUGER & THE TRINITY – This Wheel’s On Fire  ®
(NEW) MANFRED MANN – My Name Is Jack
(NEW) CILLA BLACK – Where Is Tomorrow
(4) THE ROLLING STONES – Jumping Jack Flash  (video)
(1) THE UNION GAP feat. GARY PUCKETT – Young Girl  (video)

 

To boldly go where no other TOTPs review has gone before!, well not on this site thus far. Its back to 1968 and whilst the 'swinging sixties' are taking place outside in a technicolour riot of psychedelia (or so the media would have us believe), this show along with many others is still being shown in black and white and of course would be for another year (and a bit). Whilst not to be ungrateful that there is actually a second show from this year in exististance a couple of technical issues are present, firstly the picture is dark, as in really dark. It could be this is a copy of a copy etc and its interesting the info bar at the top of the screen has it down as 3 parts. The second issue which we have encountered before is of course the muted links, so we dont get to hear Jimmy and Monkee man Davy Jones (who has brought along a guitar for the occasion and seems to enjoy himself throughout) and their no doubt witty comments between the records, shame. Starting with the charts as per normal with the number 1 record playing in the background, but wait whats this, its not a count down its a count up! from 1 to 20, weird. The 'graphics' here are very basic but do the job, although a lot of the pics are botched to include floating heads of some of the groups. At number one is The Union Gap feat. Gary Puckett 'Young Girl', it will be back later in full, so lets talk about that then.

The Equals 'Baby Come Back', seems like a logical and rousing way to start the show, an excellent energetic performance to get the crowd going. This eventually made number 1 in July once those pesky Rolling Stones have had their turn. Next up a sweet video of a lonely donkey probably looking for Blackpool beach. Of course not, its a 'home made' video (these were around in the 60s too then) to accompany Dionne Warwick 'Do You Know The Way To San Jose?' with some of those kaleidoscope effects and a fair amount of Donkey walking around footage and a few audience bits for good measure. Did the donkey find its way to San Jose?, who knows, but it seems to end happily with the donkey meeting a mate, so there you go, all together now ahhhh.....



A one man band, now there's something you don't see often these days. Until now I've not seen one on TOTP either but this is the 60s so maybe anything goes. But don't throw loose change into the hat just yet Don Partridge is here to play his record 'Blue Eyes'. Its not too bad, although I'm not overly sold on the merits of the kazoo as a proper instrument. This seems like the musical equivalent of rubbing your tum whilst patting your head (or was it the other way round) but kudos to anyone that can do this, I'm sure there are much easier ways of doing music. So far not very psychedelic, but the next record can happily fill that brief. Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & The Trinity 'This Wheel’s On Fire', a repeat, but probably the most interesting record on this show and quite a stark performance as one might expect from this group. The smoke machine is doing overtime here to get the 'on fire' look. Julie might have nailed deadpan and kooky here to, and the noisy psychedelic bit fits in nicely at the end. Thumbs up. I didn't know before this was a Bob Dylan record.



Manfred Mann look very pleased with themselves, although 'My Name is Jack' is not quite in the charts yet, a very much of the era slice-of-life style chirpy pop record, complete with whistling. I quite like this one, even with the whistling. Apparently the "Greta Garbo Home for Wayward Boys and Girls" was the nickname of a real hostel, the Kirkland Hotel, in San Francisco so there you go. Cilla Black was one of the UK's biggest pop 'girls of the 60s' although I'm sure few remember this one, again its not in the charts its a big sounding ballad that would be ok for a variety type show but its a bit unmemorable as a pop record and only reached 39, I guess her influence almost guaranteed a slot at the time hence its inclusion here. Onto another highlight of the show and another a future number one 'Jumping Jack Flash', The Rolling Stones are on video although being so dark its hard to see much except when Mick is right at the camera in his war painted look, that does look quite effective. The producers can't just play the video though and have to interject TOTP crowd shots just to remind us what show we are watching. Yep good tune, cant really criticise this one.



So we briefly heard the number one 'Young Girl' at the start of the show and now we get it in full with a video to accompany it, which looking at Popscene was shown a number of times. Of course a worthy number one with a somewhat risky theme, which I doubt anyone would touch with a barge pole today. The video itself is of course a bit arty, the civil war era soldiers shown at the front seem to be Gary and the band but for the most part its basically just a (young) girl wandering in the woods for a few minutes and some more shots of the audience for good measure. As a song though its catchy and well produced and easy to see why it was a big hit.



To end instead of playing another song, they finish with the audience dancing to the very groovy end credits theme music. As its 1968 there has been no Pan's People or Gojos who were merely occasional participants as per the remit of the show in the 60s, but I've enjoyed this episode as a stand alone snapshot of the music of the year and the show as it was in this this long lost era. My highlights were The Equals and Gary Pucket.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Malta
Gary Puckett and the Union Gap were a big deal in 1968.  Some sources say they were the only performers to have their first 5 releases reach gold status, and they may have been the top-selling musical group in 1968.  They also performed at the White House in an August 1970 event honoring the visiting Prince Charles and Princess Anne.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=prince+charles+princess+anne+white+house&&view=detail&mid=BB9B0908282FE1D94062BB9B0908282FE1D94062&&FORM=VDRVRV
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

mojo2007
In reply to this post by Mikey
saw three of these acts live, married a few weeks later
mojo
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Arlo
In reply to this post by Malta
Gary Puckett was a staple on top 40 radio here in the U.S. in the late sixties (more childhood memories).  Looks like he still performs regularly, with a full summer schedule.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
Have any of you guys watched the show yet? if so please share your thoughts.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Hanway2
In reply to this post by Mikey
 I will watch the show, and throw up a review, after I have finished a few more Pan’s reviews. I am not sure you can send me a motivational picture with this one, unless it is Julie Driscoll-  or Cilla Black.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Everything'sRosie
In reply to this post by Mikey
Yes, I've watched it. I will write a review shortly after a second watch
Queens of My Soul
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
In reply to this post by Hanway2
I can't give you a Pans pic from TOTP 1968 Hanway, so how about some Bobbie Gentry instead?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfbQUjETeVs

My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Hanway2
 Bobbie Gentry AND Pan's People- Isn't the World just perfect right now!
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Everything'sRosie
This post was updated on .
Jimmy Savile and Monkee Davy Jones are muted, though I'm not entirely sorry about that as Jones looks like he would have got on my nerves after not too long. And so, oddly, as Mikey mentions, we have a chart run-up. Hey, can't wait to see what's at No.20.

This might be at the height of psychedelia, but the chart shows there are still a few crooners hanging about. And so...we're off.

The Equals - Baby Come Back With future No.1 solo artist Eddie Grant in their ranks, it's worth pointing out this rather monotonous pop song hit the top too. Unusual to see a black band playing pop with instruments like their white brothers.

Dionne Warwick - Do You Know The Way To San Jose A fine Bacharach & David song. Dionne couldn't make it, so along with Davy's energetic dancing, we are treated to one of those strange BBC films. This time starring a donkey. No, me neither.

Don Partridge - Blue Eyes Never heard of this one before...or him. Okay record, the sound of which reminded me of a one-man band. I can just imagine him playing this outside Piccadilly Circus Underground, to a largely indifferent public.

Julie Driscoll Brian Auger and The Trinity - This Wheel's On Fire The band's name hardly rolls off the tongue, but we get some top notch psychedelia at last. The sort of performance often aired in retrospectives to show how cool the 60s were. Julie looks fabulously aloof and distant, and that dude is at war with his keyboard!

Manfred Mann - My Name Is Jack Actually it's Mike, and interestingly the band's other vocalist gets name-checked here. A bouncy pop tune, but not really my thing.

Cilla Black - Where Is Tomorrow Our Cilla's best pop days were behind her, and though she still put out some decent records in the late 60s, this wasn't one of them. Very forgettable, but those lucrative TV days are just around the corner for the lass.

The Rolling Stones - Jumpin' Jack Flash Direct from another universe. The Stones at their very best. An amazing track that I have always loved since the moment I first heard it. Mick looks super cool in his warpaint, and Brian Jones looks like a knob. What a riff, and the best thing on the show by some distance for me.

The Union Gap - Young Girl Another BBC film. A young girl in a summer dress wanders around a wintery wood, poor thing must have been frozen. A photograph of the band has been superimposed over it, in civil war uniforms (?) A quality pop tune to be fair, but one which raises the odd eyebrow these days.

And so we're done with some crowd dancing. And if Sir James of Savile was feeling a little uncomfortable by the lyrics of the No.1 song, it certainly didn't show.

Edit

Above I questioned why The Union Gap were in civil war uniforms. I must have been half dozing when I wrote that. Yes, gap in the union. I get it now. Doh. They say you lose grey cells as you get older...

Queens of My Soul
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
Everything'sRosie wrote
Hey, can't wait to see what's at No.20.
Its Des O'Connor
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

sueforever
In reply to this post by Mikey
What a fantastic show to watch. And some great acts on this programme.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
Any particular favourite Sueforever, or did you like eveything?
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

sueforever
Mikey I liked it all, am a great sixties fan.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

RYAN
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mikey
Finally got round to watching this. Totally weird like Mikey says how they thought it was a good idea make the chart run-down a chart run-up, 1 to 20. I wonder how long they had done that for before somebody realised it was a dumb thing to do. Obviously the muted links and extreme monochrome make this a difficult watch, but the quality of the music helped.  

The only record i was unfamiliar with was the Don Partridge offering. Got to agree with Mikey and also say the best things on the show were The Equals and Gary Pucket & The Union Gap, though if the Stones clip had have been in colour id have gone for that. Roll on the 70's though, much more to my liking.

RYAN
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Hanway2
In reply to this post by Mikey
   What do you do when you find yourself back several lifetimes ago? Here we are way back in the early summer of 1968, for another, and early Top Of The Pops to review. And it does seem a long, long time ago. Because that is what it is- 51 years, and so much has happened. Was I watching this at the time, a month before my 8th Birthday? Possibly, but have no memory of it, although so many of the tracks are familiar, from later exposure to them. To keep this review brief, I shall forget any excessive preamble and get to the point. Clearly in black and white, and the quality of the picture of this surviving edition form 6th June 1968 is quite dense and dark. Be that as it may, we will watch with keen intent. As I have always avowed that this was one of the great years- periods- of popular music, I hope I will not be disappointed by this snapshot of the time. And 1968 was a momentous and far-reaching year, both in and out of the music scene. Assassinations, Revolutions, Demonstrations, Riots, Black Power at the Olympics, War and Peace Protests. A year that stands out like few others in the Modern Era.
 The introductory music starts to play, a pre ‘Whole Lotta Love’ theme with the driving and percussive rhythm and the legendary statement ‘Yes, it’s number One, it’s Top of The Pops’. Here we go again. Over a chart ‘run up’ starting from the number 1, we hear that record itself ‘Young Girl’ by The Union Gap. It seems strange now to start the chart at the top and work down, as opposed as the now conventional method of doing these things the other way round. How long was this approach used? It might be hard to tell, certainly by 1970 it had been dispensed with, and the suspense, for those not in the know, attended to. And the pictures of the artists, as disembodied heads for many, may seem a little strange too. Some interesting names are found, Scott Walker at 6, Jacky and her theme for the Television programme ‘White Horses’ at 17, and His Desness ( or Des O’Connor to his fans ) at 20. And 20 is all were given. We welcome our host for the day Jimmy Savile, who has a friend with him in young Davy Jones of the Monkees. And it should never be forgotten just how big The Monkees were at this point in time. With the hits and TV show and films, and co-hosting Top Of The Pops, colleague Micky Dolenz had assisted JS a few weeks before.
 Because the Presenter links are muted, we cannot hear what Jimmy is saying, which is probably for the best, as he hands over a shape of a guitar without strings to Davy who tries to play it for a short moment. They have a brief chat, and then we go into The Equals, on site, with their very memorable hit ‘Baby Come Back’. One of the best known sounds of 1968, from a 2019 perspective, I think. The bleakness of the shown footage does not help my enjoyment, but is not too much an unsurmountable problem. With band on the stage and the dancing audience below, and it is always a great thing to see the audience dancing in these years, this is a treat of a performance. With a great beat and very up tempo, and a superb bouncing rhythm, this track is fully deserved of the number 1 spot it would later attain, and the memories still placed on it. The special effect of singer Derv Gordon in a small circle is no problem, and there is some lovely dancing from the audience, in which many girls abound, to support the happy feeling. Even Eddie Grant’s obvious miming on lead guitar near the end does not detract. A great start to the show. Don’t you think?
   After a few moments with the Silent Duo, we move on to Dionne Warwick, and the Burt Bacharach and Hal David song ‘Do You Know The Way To San Jose’. I can remember listening to a radio interview with Dionne from many many years ago, where she says that ‘you always pronounce my name wrong over here’- or words to that effect.  But Dionne is not in the studio this week, nor The Go Jos or a nascent new dance troupe for Top Of The Pops called Pan’s People, so we have a film. And what a film it is. The BBC film department at their most charming, and obscure! Whoever produced this piece presumably thought that, if you ever did reach San Jose, you would see a lot of donkeys. And donkeys are what is found here, running about the countryside, doing a quick step, even donkeys that can drive a car, at least an old style car, not a modern one. All very nice to see, I am sure. Very charming, I wonder what Dionne would have made of it. Did anybody tell her? We also get a moment of Davy Jones dancing. Ye gods! I think that Davy should stick to shaking the maracas at the front of The Monkees, but I am an old and very curmudgeonly and Davy dancing would have to go a long way to go to satisfy me. Or perhaps he was very itchy? Davy, Dionne or Donkeys- take your pick.
 Now, before the next song we get the silent presenters again, and just exactly what is JS doing? I don’t think I should ask but horses have been put down for less. Moving on swiftly we now have ‘Blue Eyes’ from former busker Don Partridge, the archetypal one-man band outfit seen in London and elsewhere throughout the 60s and 70s. Do they still exist, these mono bands, with the big bass drum on their back? With the kazoo interludes to the verses, mouth organ, proficient guitar work and the clashing tambourine, a type of musical act that has been consigned to history- unless anyone knows of a revivalist. Don had a couple of surprise hits in the late 60s, including this, and was a really welcome addition to the bursting music scene of the time. Variety from a varied musical melange. I think this type of act is due a comeback. Another good think from the show.
 Oh dear, Poor Davy! I think the close exposure to JS has had a dolorous effect on Davy’s fragile mind.  Now he thinks he is a chicken, is there anyone that can help? Perhaps Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger or The Trinity can, for they are up next with ‘This Wheel’s On Fire’, a song by Bob Dylan. And if anything can help, surely this can. One of the most iconic songs and performances from that great year of 1968. A clip that has been replayed an untold number of times, when 1960s music is the theme. And is always fantastic to watch. Obviously, it is quite dark here, in keeping with the quality of the rest of the film. There is a clearer copy of this performance which is used whenever it is replayed, this comes from a different source and from that this presentation has also survived. But the imagery on show here is inspirational, the smoke and closeness of the performers, the shimmering wheel flying across the screen, Brian Auger knocking ten bells out of his keyboard, and the fairylike dancing and gorgeous voice of Julie Driscoll. A trip back to 1968, and another world, which should never be refused, and taken as often as you wish. So, very often!
  Now JS is shaving with the microphone, so we’ll pass quickly on to the next act and it is Manfred Mann and ‘My Friend Jack’. Manfred Mann being both leader and band name you understand. Coming shortly after their big smash with the ‘Mighty Quinn’, this may seem like lesser material, and it is. What did happen at the Greta Garbo Home for Wayward Boys and Girls, or shouldn’t I ask? I hope JS wasn’t a patron. Perhaps it is for children who ‘want to be alone’. A pleasant enough song, with the repeated heavy drum beat and Mike d’Abo gives a cool performance as the vocalist, but it was never one to live in the memory for too long. Also, it is a pity that because of the darkness of the film, I cannot see the dancing audience as well as I would have liked. I am sure some of them were very good.
  Davy is telling Jimmy something and JS is nodding his head like a demented fool, I wonder what it was. No, on second thoughts I don’t. And now we have a little surprise, with Cilla Black. And a song ‘Where Is Tomorrow’ that I could not remember at all, but really quite like. Tuneful, mournful and well sung. A shame that it was not a bigger hit for her, but it found no favour with the buying public only making number 40- or 39 according to different sources. But perhaps it was too out of keeping with the time. At a time when she was still our Cilla and not the big, overwhelming showbusiness personality of later years. An understated performance, and all the better for it. Yes, a surprise for me and another good item on this excellent edition. Are there other good things are yet to come?
  They certainly continue with the next number, a film to the song ‘Jumping Jack Flash’ one of the Rolling Stones’ best tracks, I would suggest. And as before, although the quality of the film is poor and very dark, we can see enough of the Stones’ performance and Mick in his warpainted face to be able to give a good account of the number. After their brief detour with Psychedelia and ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request’ a needlessly derided album, the band returned to a more basic sound in 1968 with this single and the ‘Beggar’s Banquet’ LP. And the beginning of a very hot period for them. With Mick leering closely into the camera, Brian and Keith looking much like human flies with their big dark glasses, Bill with his dashing eye make up and a solid, grounded Charlie Watts at the back, this would have been a very extraordinary viewing for the public at home. No doubt reaffirming the Stones’ myths of the ‘bad boys’ of rock. You can bet that the elders were appalled, ‘I fought in the War you know’, and teenagers would have been enthralled. I am sure I would have been, if I had been old enough. The track is an all-time classic, not just from the Rolling Stones, who were making their fame and infamy in British Culture right at that moment. We even get some funny dancing from Davy, who seems to have found a lady friend to frolic with. More Davy dancing.
 Now Jimmy is wiping the eye of a girl audience member with her scarf. God knows what has been going on. Davy has a go himself, and they are surrounded by a bevy of beauties. Which leads us into ‘Young Girl’ by the Union Gap with Gary Puckett which we know is the number one. Another film, with the band dressed up as American Civil War Union Soldiers decorating the borders of the action, and strangely brought forward at points in the film. Which features a young lady wandering about some wooded  countryside. Is this a record company or a BBC commissioned film we have here? I do not know, but I understand that there was a promotional film to the track, and this isn’t it. Would they have made two? The Union Gap never made their way to the Top Of The Pops Studios, nor did The Go Jos or Pan’s People ever get to dance to the track, I think. Though I am sure Flick could have been inspired to create a top notch routine for this song, given the material, if required. The girl in the film looks very much like the American singer Merrilee Rush, although it I am pretty sure it isn’t, but a close resemblance. Never a song I felt much enthusiasm for, but it is good to be reminded of it again. And there are more shots if the crowd dancing, including Young David flailing his arms like good ‘un, and I like to see the crowds dancing at opportune moments in this era.
 Back to JS now, and his cartoon shirt. For one last chat with Davy. Is Jimmy hot as he keeps wiping his face? This leads us quickly to the closing theme tune and credits, which at that stage included the artists featured that week and more pleasing crowd dancing. One particular dancer caught my attention, moving prettily in a white blouse. Perhaps it was hot as Jimmy wipes more faces, before he is fortunately buried by more dancing bodies. And so out journey back to June 1968 is over. Was it worth the trip, did you enjoy it? I most certainly did. It would not have been hard to guess that, if you knew me! I liked it because I like most of the tracks on the show, and the show itself for all the dimness of the picture quality. Stand outs for me were The Equals, Rolling Stones and Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger and The Trinity, a studio performance, a film and a repeat. And for my favourite it would have to be the sound of the last named. Very familiar it is, and none the worse than that. Julie was described as the ‘Face of 1968’ somewhere. I can certainly go along with the image. The Wheel really is on fire.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: 6-6-68 With Jimmy Savile & Davy Jones

Mikey
Thanks for the comments so far. There is a colour version of Young Girl on Youtube here, which seems to be more official featuring the actual band (in their civil war costumes of course), so the version on TOTP is more likely to be a BBC creation it would seem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nV7SV3NF1k

Would anyone else like to comment on this show?, a rare chance to view a TOTP from the 60s.
My love must be a kind of blind love, I can't see anyone but you...