TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

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TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Mikey
This post was updated on .
25-2-71:   Presenter:  Jimmy Savile    

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1Y2hX5uPWjwYD_iqPXePO5Kv3xyFmsmoS (the second image on the list)

(22) ATOMIC ROOSTER – Tomorrow Night
(NEW) RAY STEVENS – Can We Get To That
(2) THE MIXTURES – The Pushbike Song ®
(23) LYNN ANDERSON – Rose Garden  (video)  (and charts)
(36) THE SHOWSTOPPERS – Ain’t Nothin’ But A Houseparty
(4) PERRY COMO – It’s Impossible  (video)
(20) CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD – Everything’s Tuesday (danced to by Pan's People)
(28) DANA – Who Put The Lights Out
(24) PAUL McCARTNEY – Another Day  (crowd dancing)
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Let’s Hang On
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS - I've Got You Under My Skin
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Medley
(1) GEORGE HARRISON – My Sweet Lord  (crowd dancing)  (and credits)
>> this edition exists at the BBC as an unedited studio tape, complete with retakes and mute DJ links.



Girls, I love the things they know
Love the things they show
Got to be where they go
Pretty girls with sunshine in their hair
The perfume that they wear
Girls are everywhere

The lyrics are from 'Girls' by Moments & Whatnauts, nothing to so with this show per-se (we may get to them at some point), but here in evidence on TOTP 1971 girls are everywhere (and occasionally a guy may have snuck in too, lucky chap). It seems like 1971 was the year of the 'hot pants' with a myriad of varieties on display including a hotpants/dungarees hybrid that seems particularly popular with the girls. At the start of 1971 a completely new set was introduced, replacing the rather chaotic and psychedelic sets of 1970 (which i do really like) with one of more openness, hanging geometric hexagon shapes and for some reason lots of shots of the orchestra and surroundings. This gives more of a live feel to proceedings but at times it felt more like an 'In concert' than TOTP, is that what they were aiming for?

So this is not what the public would have seen on broadcast, as is shown in the running order "this edition exists at the BBC as an unedited studio tape, complete with retakes and mute DJ links", which makes it an interesting if rather long watch, and this episode is one i had not seen prior to a week or so ago so it was nice to watch this rare footage. A number of the performances have no link at all as Jimmy seems to disappear completely during the middle of the show. The first act Atomic Rooster do not appear on this video, so here is a link to the performance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=As484UuVV2Y

They look typical of the type long haired band of the era, but the song isn't too avant-garde and i do like it.

The video begins with Ray Stevens, and here we see the stops and starts that make this so different and were probably a fairly regular thing, its hard to figure out quite why these stops occur but they do and all the acts just get on with it, so i'll not need to mention these further. 'Can we get to that' is ok, Ray performs it well but there really nothing much i can say about it. Major fromage alert!, heres 'The Pushbike Song' performed a month earlier and interspersed with audience shots from this week (you don't fool me Mr Producer!). To be honest i do quite like this, better move on before i lose any cool points. 'Rose Garden' plays over the charts (now on a giant screen) with the audience dancing to it (they will literally dance to anything in this era) but its cut short when the chart ends. Lynn will be in the studio in 2 weeks time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-eclUz-RYI. I really like this song too.

I'm not familiar with the Showstoppers (a name which seems ironic in this case as they have to do several takes) but this record is really good, nice funky number, Discogs says this was originally released in 1967. Just what we needed after that exersion a nice bit of crooning from Pery Como, thats variety for you. Its one of those weird videos the BBC made to fill the time in the show i guess, but heck this record is at number 4!!, so i guess its inclusion is more than valid. Whilst 'Everythings Tuesday' is very familiar to me now on first watching the Pans/Legs/Ruby routines some 6 years ago it really was a journey of discovery of decent songs that just don't get played on the usual retro stations as well as the more familiar ones. I still really like this one, so don't need to comment about it again. I also like the logo used in this period.



The lovely Dana up next with a nice if perhaps unmemorable song, she looks great though, no complaints here. Macca is the first of two Beatles (or should i say ex Beatles?) on the show with his 'slice of life' song 'Another Day'. This is a quality of course, the audience dancing less so, its hard to tell if they even dancing to the same song, Jimmy looks like he is having a seizure. To be fair this song is hardly prime dance material. So on to the main event, no not the No. 1 but the 'Album Track' section, 3 songs performed live by The Four Seasons, being critical I'm not entirely sure of the point of this, nothing against TFS at all their performances are fine, but this is starting to lose the fast pace of TOTP and for me it went on too long, perhaps the actual broadcast was ok. To end finally the No.1 of course is still 'My Sweet Lord', already at the top for a month there is really nothing i can say to sum up how good this record is, i wish i had anywhere near the talent and creativity to come up with something like this. Hare Krishna!
♥♥♥♥ Cherry, Louise, Patti and Ruth Alliance ♥♥♥♥

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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Michael
I'm really looking forward to watching this edition, Mikey, especially given the fact it features one of my very favourite Pan's People routines! :-)
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Mikey
Yes Michael, i'll be interested to see peoples views on this one since this is somewhat an unusual episode.
♥♥♥♥ Cherry, Louise, Patti and Ruth Alliance ♥♥♥♥

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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Hanway2
  I am looking forward very much to watching this and then throwing some thoughts together for a review. It will all be towards the end of this week, as another review- for a Pan's routine- is more pressing at the moment.
 
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Everything'sRosie
Atomic Rooster looked exactly how you would expect, very hairy, very serious, reminded me of the raw bluesy sound of Free. An okay number though. After a couple of false starts Ray Stevens manages to finally get to the end of his song, the sort of mawkish thing Vic Reeves used to hilariously send up on the original series of Big Night Out. "Little boys with nothing to eat, little girls with nothing on their feet". Purleeeease. Aussie band The Mixtures perform The Pushbike Song, their drummer skillfully keeping his sticks short of the skins to ensure he didn't foul-up the recording. Switch (briefly) to Lynn Anderson on horseback wearing a showbiz cowboy hat which looked to be sitting a good six inches atop her golden locks, despite this, Rose Garden is a decent C&W track. The Show-Stoppers are next with their funky hit, and the group certainly lived up to their name when their show, er...stopped. On to some easy-listening courtesy of super crooner Perry Como to which the Beeb had supplied a rather strange film. Hard to explain really, it's like a Silvikrin ad directed by Salvador Dali. What a relief then to see some familiar faces as Pan's dance to Chairman Of The Board's Everything's Tuesday. Excellent. Making the most of her Eurovision fame, Dana sings a song new to me, the song's rather forgettable but she's rather sweet. Still think Mary Hopkin should have won though. We now get some dancing hot-pants, along with a tiresome Savile Self-consciously trying to be wacky, all doing their thing to McCartney's Another Day. The next ten minutes is taken up by The Four Seasons doing some of their hits, why is it, Valli apart, this group always has a different line-up every time I see them? And so we come to the No.1, the classic My Sweet Lord, unsurprisingly like his fellow Beatle, Harrison hasn't made it to the studio. And so more audience dancing and some final Savile. You can say what you like about the man, but he's no racist, equally acting the pest to a dancing black girl.

Great fun visiting this, despite all the muting and stop/starting. Thanks for sharing the upload Mikey.
Queens of My Soul
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Mikey
Useless Info Alert! - the shapes are no mere Hexagons, oh no, actually its called a Truncated Hexahedron

♥♥♥♥ Cherry, Louise, Patti and Ruth Alliance ♥♥♥♥

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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Mikey
In reply to this post by Mikey
Mikey wrote
It seems like 1971 was the year of the 'hot pants' with a myriad of varieties on display including a hotpants/dungarees hybrid that seems particularly popular with the girls.
And here is Lulu sporting this particular garment on the 31-12-70 'Into 71' show (with a certain dance group rehersing in the background)


♥♥♥♥ Cherry, Louise, Patti and Ruth Alliance ♥♥♥♥

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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

RYAN
Administrator
In reply to this post by Mikey
Thanks for bringing this to us Mikey. It was another enjoyable way to spend 50 minutes and some of the footage was quite fascinating with Jimmy's roaming hands very noticeable. Unlike 1987, i didn't feel the need to hit the fast forward button at any time and that includes the Four Seasons stuff which did go on a bit.

Not so keen on the Pans routine. I don't really like the unflattering outfits and although the large dancing area is used to the max, i feel the dancers are just to far away from the camera a lot of the time. Good to see that some of our guys like the routine though (see PP comments), each to their own i guess.

I enjoy all the audience girl dancing stuff. In those days they seem to put so much effort into their dancing and i quite like all that. Over exuberant to the point of "look at me im on the telly, so ill make sure everyone can see what a good dancer i am".

Not a patch on the last offering a couple of weeks ago, but id give the show itself an 8. I'm not sure i can say i had a favourite, but the bizarre film that accompanied the Perry Como song kept me attentive.

Quiz question - What have The Four Seasons & The Beatles got in common ? Clue - something to do with personnel.
RYAN
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Michael
Re. Your question, Ryan: I'm usually quite good at these sort of questions, but in this case I haven't a clue. The only thing I can think of would be Billy Preston: maybe he played keys on a FV&t4S track?

Another clue, maybe? ;-)
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

RYAN
Administrator
This post was updated on .
Michael wrote
Re. Your question, Ryan: I'm usually quite good at these sort of questions, but in this case I haven't a clue. The only thing I can think of would be Billy Preston: maybe he played keys on a FV&t4S track?

Another clue, maybe? ;-)
No, its not him.

Answer - Both have left-handed bass players. Joe Long in the Four Seasons 1965-1974 and obviously McCartney.
RYAN
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Michael
Duh. How obvious was that. I thought the answer was only going to be discovered after doing lots of research. Instead, it was staring me in the face! What's even more annoying is last night, while watching the clips, I was thinking to myself that FV&t4S's bass player had an unusual left-hand technique. I'll get my coat...
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

The Rubberband Man
In reply to this post by Mikey
Mikey wrote
Useless Info Alert! - the shapes are no mere Hexagons, oh no, actually its called a Truncated Hexahedron
They were popular shapes in the early 70's Mikey. I remember they installed some in the local park so we could climb on them. They were painted orange too - it was just like being in the TOTPs studio
All bound for Lulu Land (in an E Type Jag)
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Mikey
Thanks RBM, i wonder if any of the audience or crew tried to climb them at some point.

This episode does not seem to be garnering much interest like the last one, hopefully some more reviews are forthcoming.
♥♥♥♥ Cherry, Louise, Patti and Ruth Alliance ♥♥♥♥

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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Hanway2
  I am still working on my review to this edition, Mikey. Hopefully it will be  ready to be posted in a few days. But it will be somewhat shorter than my previous submission, I have to say.
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

PattiforPM
In reply to this post by Mikey
Well this episode was quite a contrast with the '73 one for me, even allowing for the wacky silent host and the interruptions!  Honestly it confirms to me that is not my favourite era.  Atomic Rooster were very reasonable, Ray Stevens was very boring, the Mixtures were just ok, Lynn Anderson showed some promise on that horse but then disappeared.  The Showstoppers were actually very good I thought and then came Perry Como!  The song was crap and the video was weird.  How did they time warp Faith Hill into it and still keep it boring?  And what's with the chasing frogman and the huge dead bird?  Did somebody use acid?  Surely Como would have been horrified and I was just terminally puzzled.  Then came Pans People and I was so relieved, even though I hate the song and thought it was so unfair that the crowd was in skimpy hot pants and boots and Pans People were in Auntie outfits.  Seeing this performance in context did help me though.  Dana was a bit cute but that was all, the Sir Paul song was enjoyable and the crowd were very watchable and then came the Four Seasons.  Now it is no secret that Frankie Valli is not my favourite high pitched singer but I must say they did a fairly good job of entertaining me for 10 minutes.  They are a bit cabaret lounge though.  Last comes the second best song by an ex-Beatle and the crowd seem to love it.  I did enjoy watching this episode but mainly for historical reasons.  Jimmy was embarrassing to watch and I doubt hearing him would have improved this but I wonder what I would have thought at the time.  Anyway the Showstoppers get my vote quite easily with only the audience ladies as their competition really.
Some Dancers who gave a good time, broke all the rules, played all the fools, yeah yeah yeah they blew our minds
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

sueforever
In reply to this post by Mikey
Really enjoyed watching the 71 Top of the Pope show. A really interesting programme to look at. We have some interesting artists in this programme. But the most fascinating thing was the way they kept stopping for no reason. Another great choice Mikey. A better than the show that was shown on the Thursday before.
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Willoway
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Mikey
From the credits onwards, this seems a fairly lacklustre episode, and there’s no glorious colour events that were missed by most viewers (1976 supposedly the tipping point where the UK had more colour than B/W TV sets). However it still sustains my belief all vintage TOTP is good, there’s plenty to enjoy, though there’s an awful lot that’s hard to love. Perhaps the best aspect is the already mentioned audience dancing - the non-professional dancing young women in early 70s high street fashions have an endless charm.

(ATOMIC ROOSTER – Tomorrow Night
I generally am not keen on the soft rock of the early seventies, and this falls into the category of what I don't like.

RAY STEVENS – Can We Get To That
I recall Ray Stevens makes a brief archive appearance in the TOTP 25th anniversary edition singing ‘The Streak’ Clearly beginning his lucky two-run streak when it comes to the TOTP archive. This song, like the Streak, no merit or interest.

THE MIXTURES – The Pushbike Song ®
The inserts into this harmless bit of pop got TOTP2 into trouble . A bit ironic I suppose that the repeat  rescued the performance from oblivion, but the inserts returned it back, at least from broadcast.

LYNN ANDERSON – Rose Garden  (video)  (and charts)
Really love the mixed ranching and country singer iconography. While I’ll issue the standard disclaimer I’m not a country music fan, I like the world-weary lyrics so this is my favourite performance of the show. My favourite from the last show was country too, maybe I protest too much.

THE SHOWSTOPPERS – Ain’t Nothin’ But A Houseparty
No interest for me as I have little liking for soul – other than that the verses remind me very much of this schön song, but maybe it's just me

PERRY COMO – It’s Impossible  (video)
Terribly dated croon, with weird video with no redeeming charm.

CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD – Everything’s Tuesday (danced to by Pan's People)
I like the song, and love the well-executed PP performance, has a very nice early-seventies feel to the whole thing.

DANA – Who Put The Lights Out
Pleasant on the eye, but a dull song.

PAUL McCARTNEY – Another Day  (crowd dancing)
I like the song, and love the dancing (except for Jimmy larking about).

(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Let’s Hang On
One consequence of the gradual fading of the light is that I’m finding the vocal groups of the late fifties/early sixties a lot more appealing than in my more spry years. However, not so much the Four Seasons yet, perhaps one for the nursing home. Having said that, the double-denim boys are apparently live, judging by the cabling, and certainly an opportunity to see a little of their very fine back catalogue, with Frankie and the other three. Note like last time, a singer of a Grease track appears (Barry Gibb apparently regrets he failed to spot the value of appearing on the Grease film and soundtrack, if he had, 'Grease' would have been a Bee Gee performance).

(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS - I've Got You Under My Skin
A stage show tune from the 30s – far too MoR even for my rather dated tastes.

(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Medley
I suspect concert goers' hearts always sink when they hear a medley, as it’s probably to give time for the band’s exciting new sounds, however in this case we are protected by the time limitations of the programme to find out if there’s a lot of new songs the FSs are keen to perform for us.

(GEORGE HARRISON – My Sweet Lord  (crowd dancing)  (and credits)
George's version of He’s So Fine is beloved of easy listening stations. A nicely done song with the great switch in backing vocal , and love the PP video for this. However, I feel a bit preached to, which is a bit of a downer for me.

Ideally I would vote for a show appearance, especially a live one, but I can't vote for any of those in the studio, so my vote goes to Lynn Anderson.

...is she really going out with him?
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

Hanway2
In reply to this post by Mikey
   I do admit to find the programme now offered up to review a rather difficult watch. This is because of the absence of a flowing progression about the programme. The stuttering nature of what we have presented before us makes this task of reviewing a difficult and unedifying problem. Perhaps that is the reason I have struggled to think with clarity, and left me bereft of coherent and flowing thoughts on this show. Yet, I will try my best!! One thing though, it will not be necessary on this occasion to repeat my undying approval for the 1970s, as that has been stated by me over numerous examples already, no less than on the previous Top Of The Pops review from 1973.
  We have Jimmy Savile as our host. With what we know about him now, and many suspected aeons ago, it is quite easy to think he is up to no good, every time we see him, particularly so before the chart run down. Perhaps that is the truth not far removed, perhaps? And it is probably for the best that we cannot hear him, either. But moving on to more edifying sights, there is one of the best visions of all. The female audience. Accuse me of what you will, but watching the young female dancers in any show about this period is a magnificence in itself. Some may be churlish and decry them as not good dancers. And miss the point by miles! Their movement, with a mixture of self-consciousness and carefree abandon, is worth any time spent watching. They move deliciously and delightfully and I am glad they did. And the fashions of the time are glorious and endearing, and manifold. As has been noted, Hot Pants were all the rage at the time, in various styles including the bibbed version- and don’t they look great, in my eyes at least! But short mini-skirts, or long maxi-dresses, or even a lengthy t-shirt, they all look stylish, fashionable and happy to be there- as so it should be. It is evident that on this show a number have come with numbered t-shirts, presumably as a countdown motif to number 1. Was this a custom at the time, or a rare occasion when this happened? I do not know the answer, but cannot think of other instances, at this point.
  And the dancing girls are much in evidence in the Atomic Rooster performance, as they are found on and by the stage. Showing how varied were the charts at this time, Atomic Rooster, who would only trouble them in 1971, were a quintessential progressive rock band of the time, many of which- and there were many around- would not even entertain the thought of appearing on TOTPs, though some did gloriously. And ‘Tomorrow Night’ should be considered at the more commercial end of the style. With polygonal shapes in all directions, and invading the stage to boot. This is music that so reminds me of the early 70s, and the stuff I ‘cut my teeth on’, as the saying goes. With some former members from The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, this is so enjoyable to watch and hear again. Oh those days, with great recall I can see them! And did I mention the lovely dancing girls? I don’t think I did, but here they look ‘fabulous’ and keep the dance moving, to what is not usually a music to dance to- leastways I would never have danced to it. But I am glad they did. If this was the start, it was a high one.
  As Atomic Rooster have been tacked on as an extra, we can move on to the rest of the show for appraisal. What were the reasons for all the false starts? Was it problems with the orchestra, or some technical equipment? Not being involved in Television in any way,  I do not know if this is typical of recordings from then, or even now. Does this happen often? And as the artists all accept the inconvenience without problem, is it something to which they would expect and are accustomed? Ray Stevens, long before he started Streaking, performs a rather trite and insubstantial song but with a good message, ‘Can We Get To That’ which never reached to top 50, despite this exposure. Ray and piano start, then have to stop, and start again, what seems too many times. Firstly, when someone visibly interrupts him, then when in full flow the sound is lost, all of which would be very frustrating, to any artist. But despite this he gives a fine, driving performance as a good musician would. And should, at this period. And the glimpses of the girls dancing on the stage, brings the spectacle higher. And makes it even better. I like this more than I should, methinks.
  Now The Mixtures with some bubble gum pop and what is a really annoying song, after you hear it a few times, with a drummer that doesn’t look like he goes anywhere near his drums. As this is a repeat from an earlier edition, there is not much to say from me, apart from it being a sufficient showing from the band, for the track. More dancing girls from the is always a plus though- perhaps the producer knew! And I do remember the song very well, back from those days of yesteryear. I had the idea that we do not hear so much from Australian artistes these days, but that cannot be true with Kylie and Nick Cave in existence.
  We begin to see a film of Lynn Anderson mounted and herding cattle for a short while, looking pretty fine in her Western saddle, cowgirl gear and hat. As someone who likes a fair portion of Country Music, but not all of it, and very little after 1975, I would have appreciated seeing more of this film, but at least we can hear the track play out over the charts and crowd dancing, as the count begins from number 30. And what a number of star names were in the chart that week, ‘The Byrds’, ‘Kinks’, ‘Martha Reeves and The Vandellas’, even Jackie Lee with what would have been the theme song to ‘Rupert Bear’- I would have loved to have seen the beautifully voiced Jackie sing that on TOTPs. ( I know you can catch it on other performances on the internet ). Even if this edition being reviewed was not seen as of the highest standard, the names of the top 30 acts will indicate the high quality of tracks residing there. Some acts may have been past their best, but even their weaker output outshines most of what would come later.
  On to The Showstoppers, with a re-issue of the song ‘Ain’t Nothing But a Houseparty’, which had been a hit for them in 1968, in a slightly different version I believe. Was this a Northern Soul classic of the time, leading to this re-issue? If it wasn’t, it should have been! But now another performance marred by false starts, which makes the whole film more difficult to enjoy. But enjoy this performance I undoubtedly do. A failure at the beginning, with the group accept with cam resignation and a shrug of the shoulders from the singer. Then they get halfway through the song before another interruption, this time met by a little whistle of annoyance from the vocalist. After another very fleeting attempt, we go again- and this time for good. The group are smartly dressed, the singer gives a great performance of the song, and the backing vocalists provide a very well choreographed routine, which I am sure they could go on all night if needed. ( Shades of The Tams later in 1971, but better ). And of course, I did notice the dancing girls by the side of the stage. Who could miss them or not be entertained by them? One thing about this song, I always feel the vocalist sings the word ‘House PARTY’ on the wrong beat, but as I do not have a extensive portfolio of Soul hits, then what do I know about anything on the subject.
  The film for Perry Como’s ‘It’s Impossible’ is distinctively odd, I wonder what Perry thought about it if he knew? It is daftly entertaining, and looks like it was filmed on the banks of the River Thames somewhere. And whose idea was it, I wonder? The product of a strange, or very creative, mind. Interesting to watch once or twice, but not repeatedly. I wonder who the actors were? Presumably nothing to do with Perry or his recording company, but created as filler by the BBC. I can remember when singers like Perry and Andy Williams had shows broadcast at peak viewing hours on Television in the UK. The waning of the American shows and artistes at peak hours has been a noticeable feature these last 30 years or so.
  Pan’s People dance to ‘Everything’s Tuesday’. I have reviewed this routine in the relevant place elsewhere, so will not repeat myself too much. But I think that in their knickerbockers and floppy hats the girls all look rather glamorous, and turn of the 20th Century in style. Our ever enchanting Edwardian Ladies, all ready for a bicycle ride on a bright sunny day. The routine is charming, and the girls look very elegant. But I wonder about the camerawork, which looks out of line at some points. Such as when the girls stand in line at 23.30, 23.36 and 23.41 in the whole video, and the camera angle is too much to the left hand side. And later about 25.00 when the camera zooms in too close to the group. But it is always an enjoyable watch, and a favourite of some Pan’s People devotees. Especially us who like early Pan’s. A Pan’s People routine is a highlight of any Top Of The Pops, and they do not disappoint here at all. For the record’s sake I marked the routine at 8.5/10 and gave the dancers’ award to Ruth. Her face being framed by the brim of her hat was always a point of accord from me. Another to savour over repeat viewings.
  Dana was such a little sweetie, back in those days, and I admit to having a crush on her when younger, which would have been about the time of this edition. After seeing her win the previous year’s Eurovision Song Contest, at the expense of Mary Hopkin, I had already noticed a young and youthful beauty. The song ‘Who Put The Lights Out’ is very lightweight and flimsy however, as a follow up to her winning entry ‘All Kinds of Everything’. There are plenty of close-ups of her delicately pretty face and charming smile, all of which would have been noticed by a 10 year old boy living in London watching on. And Dana herself would have been 19 at the time of this show. Such a wee cutie! It is noted that, from what we see of the audience, there is not a lot of movement, at a time when the audience would dance to almost anything played before them. Only in the final closing moment to we see some body swaying by those who maybe have reckoned how the rhythm of the song unfolds. And they might be being watched.
  Plenty of dancing to Paul McCartney’s track ‘Another Day’ as recompense. Paul not being present, and a song we are sure Pan’s People danced to on another occasion, this time we have the collective crowd, the gathered mass, the grateful audience. And we can watch joyfully. And as mentioned watching the girls dance was a high point of any Top Of The Pops from the first part of the 1970s. There were some men there as well, for those who are interested. But for many of us, girls dancing was a main attraction, at any time. We can see the gloriously varied fashions and hairstyles, and enjoy their eternal youthfulness, in this recording they are forever young. The whole effect is spoiled by a certain ‘gentle’man being focused upon who looks unwell, or at least needs putting out of his misery. ‘Nurse, the screens’! Back to the girls, and I noticed eagerly one attractive brunette in mauve whose movement captured my attention. But there we may let it rest. Crowd dancing in 1971. Yes please! And the song itself is a pleasing one to watch them dance.
  And now we have The Four Seasons in session with three songs. I cannot remember how long this feature continued, but it was a large part of 1971, I think. Perhaps it was an attempt to show that Top Of The Pops was a serious music programme, where serious artists could come and be found, not just the chart huggers. We know, that at the time there were a large, more underground, stream of talent who would not normally consider appearing on the show, unless they had an unlikely or unlooked for hit. Possibly this ‘album’ spot was created to appeal to them. And on this occasion we have The Four Seasons and some of their biggest hits, but again mired in a sea of false starts. After the first of which, Frankie Valli lets out a little high-pitched yell. Of dissatisfaction? I would be sure a professional such as he would find this ever so frustrating. Anyway, after a few attempts we are off again, as if we are at a concert of theirs. A medley of Four Seasons old hits is never to be sneezed at, but does seem an out of place distraction for a chart show such as this. And does dampen the fast flowing action of successive hit acts, in studio or on record. Although it was less than 10 years since the Four Seasons were at their most successful as a charting and hit machine in the U.K, it does seem that they have now turned into a cabaret act. One for the older generation, not the bright young things of a post psychedelic and soulful World. And it seems the audience treated them as such, as if in a sit down club, waiting for their supper. At this remove, it is amusing to think that Four Seasons have morphed into the Bay City Rollers with the song ‘Bye Bye Baby’ at the end of the medley- but this was 4 years before the Rollers had a chart-topper with that number.
  All things must come to an end, and so does this edition of TOTPs. I have enjoyed it, but not as much as the 1973 show, for review previously. Playing out to ‘My Sweet Lord’ and George Harrison, and the attendant crowd, after Jimmy the silent one closes off the show. The return of the dancing throng, including the brunette in mauve, so let me open my eyes and watch as the ending comes. Unfortunately that does include some of our host acting the goat, and asking for a ‘bunch of fives’, through the false ending, if I may delicately say so! Again the young girls in their heights of fashion, including some very fetching white boots, are all in evidence. Even a few men can be found there, but are hurriedly passed over for the next dancing doll. 1971 is a long time ago now, some of the people here are no longer with us, acts or audience, and for some the memory will have faded beyond recall. I have no memory of watching this edition back in February 1971, but I may have done so. The memory has vanished as completely as a snowball in a furnace. It is no longer there, and doubt it ever was.
  As stated I have enjoyed the show, despite the faltering and irritating stops in the programme. To pick a highlight must clearly include Pan’s People, a focal point for any Top Of The Pops in which they appeared, but to choose them in these circumstances would not be fair and so must be passed over, if to disallow any accusation of laziness in the reviewer. For my choice for this edition I have gone for The Showstoppers and ‘Ain’t Nothing But a Houseparty’. A fine soulful song, a northern Soul Classic for sure, and an excellent performance from singer- Earl Smith?- and group. Well done sirs! You rose above adversity admirably and effortlessly. A big hand for you! Oh February 1971. A very short time after decimalisation, on the 15th of the month. Goodbye shillings, florins and 240 pennies to the pound! You served us well for hundreds of years, but your day has gone and a new dawn beckons- farewell! The past may be a foreign country, and there might have been much wrong with the early 70s, in a Political sense, looking from a present day perspective. But for those who remember the time well, such as me, it was an unbeatable time to be young- and alive, with all your hopes and dreams still to be fulfilled. A far distant country with high gleaming towers and broad fertile acres.


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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

CoffeeThing
I really enjoyed this, seeing the raw tape and the way they stopped and started things. So many great songs, memories of being not quite five, the songs that would play on the radio and are engrained in my mind with memories of those days. It's hard to believe it's nearly fifty years ago. I loved seeing Pan's People, I loved seeing the show in colour, or at all in reality, and The Four Seasons were great, that was a really enjoyable segment. Thanks again Mikey.
This week, I are be mostly just being.
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Re: TOTP 25-2-71 with Jimmy Savile

VintageVideos
In reply to this post by Mikey
Just a couple of quick notes about this vintage TOTP show:

(22) ATOMIC ROOSTER – Tomorrow Night
Liked it back then but AR belong to the sort of bands which I find unappealing now.

(NEW) RAY STEVENS – Can We Get To That
It's an almost forgotten fact that this was originally released as a double A-sided single with "Bridget The Midget". CWGTT is nice but certainly nothing special. The single had not yet entered the charts and someone seemed to think that this would be the more popular side, possibly because it was in a similar 'preaching style' as his previous hit offering "Everything Is Beautiful". Obviously the public didn't agree!

(2) THE MIXTURES – The Pushbike Song ®
A nice song which was released in several different versions by different artists at the time, but you can't beat the original! If it sounds like "In The Summertime", that's most certainly no coincidence as the Mixtures had a big hit in Australia with "In The Summertime" in 1970 during the "1970 radio ban". Mungo Jerry returned the "favour" much later when they recorded their version of "The Pushbike Song"!

(23) LYNN ANDERSON – Rose Garden  (video)  (and charts)
Country classic and still a good song. A second version, released by Australian band New World, got to No. 15 at the same time.

(36) THE SHOWSTOPPERS – Ain’t Nothin’ But A Houseparty
Just like "Hey Girl Don't Bother Me" this was popular enough on the Northern Soul circuit to re-enter the charts. Good soul song but not great IMO.

(4) PERRY COMO – It’s Impossible  (video)
This was the music my parents might have listened to. Typical cheap early 70s TOTP film with little or no connection to the song.

(20) CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD – Everything’s Tuesday (danced to by Pan's People)
Did I already mention that an audio recording of most of the original show exists? This is what JS said when Flick appeared on the TV screens:
"And now, well covered-up against the winter, it's Pan's People with Chairmen of the Board and 'Everything is Tuesday'". "Well covered-up" may have been an expression of a certain degree of disappointment, so no "one for the lads" in this link...
One of my favourite routines from 1971 and definitely the highlight of this rather average show.

(28) DANA – Who Put The Lights Out
Well, I do have a soft spot for the lovely Dana, and I think this Paul Ryan composition is actually a very nice song. By the way, she is wearing the same dress as on "disco 71". Contrary to popular belief, this was not the follow-up single to her Eurovision entry "All Kinds Of Everything"; the follow-up was actually a record aptly titled "I Will Follow You" which however bombed completely.

(24) PAUL McCARTNEY – Another Day  (crowd dancing)
Good song and nice dancing. This was Paul's first solo single after the Beatles split, both sides originally only available as a 7" and not on any album.

(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Let’s Hang On
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS - I've Got You Under My Skin
(ALBUM TRACK) THE FOUR SEASONS – Medley
This is all quite nice but as others have said, it seemed so out of place on the show.

(1) GEORGE HARRISON – My Sweet Lord  (crowd dancing)  (and credits)
Terrible song but nice dancing, so best enjoyed with the volume turned down...

Best song and performance (apart from Pan's People): Dana
If I only had one love yours would be the one I'd choose
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